Reasons your business should use 2 way radios

earpieceWell ladies and gentlemen, i’ve the second excellent earpiece article to read, i know, you don’t need to thank me all, just add a social like to the piece to demonstrate your appreciation.

Easy to use, rugged and affordable. In the competitive construction and manufacturing field, improving productivity and controlling costs has never been more important. Motorola and Kenwood business two-way radios provide clear communication – often in noisy environments – and that’s essential to avoiding downtime, accelerating job progress and enabling faster response.

Instant communication in Construction means: Improved jobsite coordination, Reduced operational costs, Faster delivery and material coordination, Smoother work crew scheduling, Quick coordination and response to emergencies, Enhanced safety and security, Immediate production updates, Increased customer service and satisfaction and Reduced monthly operating costs.

Some of the reason businesses purchase two way radios is worker safety and liability issues, pressure to finish projects faster, profit margins are thin, getting more done with fewer workers, workers carry many tools on the job, workers can coordinate and quickly respond to accidents, or emergencies, maintain constant contact with and among workers to help, mobilize them and get tasks completed faster, affordable walkie talkie radios help make workers more productive and accountable. Leaner work crews stay focused on the job at hand and keep projects moving. Durable, lightweight and easy to use, the walkie talkie radios clip right on the tool belt.

On-Site Two-Way Business Radios uphold that superior standard. Each radio and radio accessory is backed by a limited one-year warranty on parts and labor. So when you select the walkie talkie, you’ll experience the same exceptional quality you’ve come to expect from all Motorola and Kenwood products. Some even have a two year warranty. See the manufacturer for details.

Two-Way Business Radios are a powerful combination of exceptional audio quality and excellent durability. Discover what many managers already know — Motorola two-way business radios offer you a powerful tool for enhancing employee productivity and overall customer satisfaction. Now, through the enhanced technology you get performance that you can leverage in your company or facility.

Rugged and Water Resistant are ways to describe most Business Two Way Radios. Durable metal die cast chassis helps radios hold up under demanding conditions. These 2 way radios meets Military 810 C, D, E, F and IP54/55 specifications for shock, rain, humidity, salt fog, vibration, sand, dust, temperature shock, and high and low temperatures. The IP54/55 tests include subjecting the radio to a high-speed, high-volume shower from all directions for three minutes.

Two-way radios offer the range and features that can help you increase productivity and efficiency, enhance security, and improve overall operation or customer service—all at the push of a button. Making sure your 2way radios are charged and ready to go is effortless too. Multi-unit and single drop-in chargers keep radios charged, ready, and centrally located. And the rechargeable lithium ion battery provides long battery life.

Improving efficiency and productivity – from department stores to large hotels, from restaurants to campuses, it’s why more businesses and schools use Motorola and Kenwood business two-way radios. They’re convenient, economical and the key to ensuring a streamlined process and enhanced customer service in retail, restaurant and hospitality establishments. Let’s not forget the manufacturing and construction industry. These 2-ways are long lasting and durable.

Narrow-banding is in effect On January 1, 2013, all public safety and business industrial land mobile radio systems operating in the 150-512 MHz radio bands must cease operating using 25 kHz efficiency technology, and begin operating using at least 12.5 kHz efficiency technology. This deadline is the result of an FCC effort that began almost two decades ago to ensure more efficient use of the spectrum and greater spectrum access for public safety and non-public safety users. Migration to 12.5 kHz efficiency technology (once referred to as Re-farming but now referred to as Narrowbanding) will allow the creation of additional channel capacity within the same radio spectrum, and support more users. As of January 1, 2011, the Commission no longer accepts applications for new wide-band 25 kHz operations, or modification of existing wideband 25 kHz stations that expand the authorized interference contour.

After January 1, 2013, licensees not operating at 12.5 kHz efficiency will be in violation of the Commission’s rules and could be subject to FCC enforcement action, which may include admonishment, monetary fines, or loss of license. source: http://www.motorola.com http://www.fcc.gov http://www.kenwoodusa.com

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Which Major Discoveries led to the Invention of the Two-Way Radio?

earpieceYou’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about radio earpiece’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

The modern two-way radio, which is a direct descendent of the WW2-era Walkie-talkie, first became recognizable in the years just before the outbreak of World War 2. Its origins are an interesting story in their own right (but I’ll condense it here).

Three names are usually mentioned with regards to the invention of the walkie-talkie…

The first is Canadian inventor Donald Hings (1907 – 2004), who invented an early version of the technology back in 1937 (although it wasn’t widely acknowledged or used). Then, there’s American inventor Al Gross (1918 – 2000), who patented the name ‘walkie-talkie’ for his own invention a year later in ’38. Because of the ubiquity of the name, Gross became the best known ‘inventor’ of the technology at the time, even though it had technically existed for 12 months beforehand. However, this isn’t to detract from Gross’ claim, because his version of the walkie-talkie was actually quite different from Hings’ (despite operating on the same essential principles).

Then, there’s Dan Noble (1901 – 1980), a Motorola employee who, although he definitely did not invent the technology, certainly did lead the team that created the widely used WW2-era walkie-talkies. Hings’ version of the technology wasn’t used by the military until 1942, which led to Dan Noble being credited with the invention.

So, make of that mess what you will…

Now, to go back further (and get to the meat of your question), here is a list of discoveries that led to the creation of the two-way radio.

James Clark Maxwell (1831-1879), a mathematical physicist (and one of a seemingly endless line of genius Scotsmen) demonstrated that electromagnetic waves could propagate in free space in his 1865 paper ‘A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field’ (of which the most famous fan was Albert Einstein). This led German physicist Heinrich Hertz (1857 – 1894) to build on Maxwell’s pioneering work by conclusively proving the existence of electromagnetic waves in 1887.

After that, Serbian-American inventor, physicist, vegetarian and absolute genius Nikola Tesla (1856 – 1943) demonstrated the transmission of radio frequency energy in 1892. After that, Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi (1874 – 1937) built a wireless system capable of transmitting signals over unprecedented distances in 1895 – which is pretty much the birth of radio.

This was an important area of study at the time; the first wireless telephone conversation took place in 1880 and was made by Alexander Graham Bell (1847 – 1922), who was another Scot, incidentally. A lot of people were working on similar technology, so it would not have been unlike the ‘space race’ of the 50’s and 60’s at the time.

Marconi went about taking over pretty much all business related to the invention of the radio (which was, eventually, credited solely to him) and, by 1907, he had established the first commercial transatlantic radio service (and also pretty much screwed Tesla out of any/all royalties he would have been owed. Nice).

Thanks to the work of Julio Cervera Baviera (1854 – 1929) the Spanish army became the first to use radio for military purposes (at least, as far as I’m aware, anyway) in the early 1900’s.

Canadian inventor Reginald Fessenden (1866 – 1932) (who also helped to develop sonar and TV, incidentally), invented AM radio (no, not the ‘Breakfast Show’ –it means that more than one station can broadcast signals) when, on Christmas Eve 1906, he played some violin and read from the Bible.

Eventually, all ships were equipped with radio transmission capability, with Marconi owning a total monopoly over ship-to-shore communication. Ship-to-shore contact became a subject of increased awareness and importance following the Titanic disaster of 1912 and radios began to be seen even more as a crucial safety measure in all areas of industry as a result. Look up the 1913 ‘International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea’ (it has a Wikipedia page, I just checked) for more info.

Skipping forward a bit, now. Throughout the 1930’s, there were a ton of minor (and major) improvements made to the technology, more than a few made by Marconi and his engineers. Some really clever people made their mark on the fledgling technology here, but if I mention them all, we’ll never get to the end.

Oh, by the way, FM radio was subsequently invented by American electrical engineer Edwin Armstrong (1890 – 1954) in 1933.

By the late 30’s, Hings comes into the picture, as does the rising spectre of a terrifyingly advanced Nazi Germany. The race was on to have the best equipped armies out there fighting the Axis powers and the allies wisely put a huge amount of manpower into the development of portable radio communication. It was a decision which led directly to the rapid co-opting of Hings and Gross’ work, as well as the later improvements made by Noble.

This is a long and fascinating story (about which many books have been written), but, as a ‘potted history’ of sorts, I hope that answers your question.