NEW MEADOWLANDS STADIUM KEEPS STAFF TALKING AND FANS HAPPY

With a lot information on the net about earpiece’s it’s hard to discover the top and generally truthful information. here is an article from a good website that i believe as true, don’t quote me on it but please read and enjoy

New Meadowlands Stadium deploys digital MOTOTRBO™ radios with Capacity Plus to help employees collaborate and ensure superior guest experience.

New Meadowlands Stadium Company needed greater capacity and coverage for its new 2.1 million square foot stadium but obtaining new frequencies would be

a challenge.

With nearly 4,000 workers trying to keep more than 82,000 enthusiastic football fans happy in the new stadium, staff would need to rely heavily on two-way radios to communicate. Having leased an analog system in the old stadium, which would not

provide the sufficient capacity and coverage required in the new stadium, the organization decided to purchase a new system. This meant obtaining new frequencies—­­a challenge, especially in a major metropolitan area.

SOLUTION

MOTOTRBO digital two-way radio system with Capacity Plus would easily accommodate the stadium’s expanded workforce and enable coverage throughout the stadium.

MOTOTRBO digital technology divides each frequency into two time slots, doubling the number of users on

the system and reducing the number of frequencies the organization would need to purchase. MOTOTRBO also provides crisp, clear audio all the way to the edge of the coverage area, extending usable range. And with MOTOTRBO’s noise-cancelling technology and sophisticated audio accessories, even most staff working inside the noisy environment of “the bowl” on game day would be able to clearly hear messages.

RESULT

With New Meadowlands Stadium’s MOTOTRBO digital two-way radio system, staff can easily collaborate and offer excellent service to fans.
“Motorola is a very strong partner to the National Football League (NFL) and the Official Wireless Communications Provider of the NFL for the past

13 years. MOTOTRBO radios gave us the opportunity to control our destiny,” says Peter Brickman, New Meadowlands Stadium CTO. “We wanted our

own frequencies; to own our own hardware and maintain it; and ensure that our people would have the communications they needed to do their jobs. The MOTOTRBO system is a vital asset to stadium operations.”

Opening its doors in March 2010, New Meadowlands Stadium, located in East Rutherford, NJ, is the new home of the NFL’s New York Jets and New York Football Giants. Also serving as the venue for many other large-scale events, the stadium can host 82,500 fans and offers the latest technology for quicker ticket scanning, faster trips to the concession stand and instant HD video highlights throughout the building

to provide memorable event day experiences for all guests.

The first of its kind

As the first venue in the nation to serve as home for two NFL teams, the $1.6 billion, privately financed New Meadowlands Stadium is a 50-50 joint venture between the New York Jets and the New York Football Giants. Completed in early 2010, the stadium employs nearly 4,000 workers and will host 20 NFL games per season, as well as numerous other events ranging from international soccer to high-profile rock concerts.

New stadium, even higher standards

With the introduction of its new venue, the New Meadowlands Stadium Company committed to providing an exciting and safe event day experience for all guests, a goal each employee takes very seriously. In order to achieve that goal, however, staff members must be able to seamlessly communicate and collaborate, no matter where they are within the stadium or on the grounds.

“It was vital that every one of our departments, from Security to Guest Services to Operations, would be able to identify issues and resolve them quickly,” says Peter Brickman, New Meadowlands Stadium CTO.

Addressing capacity issues first

Trying to keep more than 82,000 enthusiastic football fans happy in the new stadium requires staff to depend on two-way radios to communicate. Prior to moving from the old stadium to the new facility, a leased analog system was employed. However, with the much larger stadium and larger staff, that system would be unable to handle the load, resulting in numerous channel busies and unacceptable radio interference.

One potential solution to the problem would be to add frequencies; however, obtaining enough frequencies, especially in a major metropolitan area, can be a problem.

“When we started the process, we were told that it would be extremely challenging getting all the frequencies we needed because they just might not

be available,” Brickman says. “We knew we would need to find a radio system that we could build and manage around the frequencies we would be able to get in order to adequately meet the organization’s needs.”

Next, extending coverage and improving audio quality

The size of the stadium also represented a coverage challenge. The massive 2.1 million square foot arena was too large for the limited range of the analog radios. Inadequate range would prevent the consistently available communications Brickman needed in order

to ensure that stadium staff had the tools they needed to fully collaborate and get the job done quickly and efficiently.

And finally, audio quality was a concern. Anyone who has ever managed an arena that hosts sporting events, concerts and other activities that bring together large numbers of fans is familiar with the importance of a communications system that can overcome high noise levels. Audio quality would be a critical requirement at New Meadowlands Stadium, especially in the midst of extreme noise produced by high-energy game days when touchdowns and great plays can raise crowd noise to levels of 120 decibels (dB) or more.

New Meadowlands Stadium opts for MOTOTRBO Digital Radios

New Meadowlands Stadium Company decided to purchase a new system that it could own, operate and maintain itself. That also meant obtaining new frequencies—­a challenge anywhere, but especially in a major metropolitan area.

Brickman knew he had a challenge on his hands and called in experts from Regional Communications, a local Motorola channel partner, to discuss a solution. Regional Communications recommended a MOTOTRBO digital two-way radio system with Capacity Plus.

Double the capacity, extend range and enjoy crystal clear audio

MOTOTRBO’s digital technology would address New Meadowlands Stadium’s capacity issues by dividing the stadium’s frequencies into two time slots, doubling the number of users on the system with no increased risk of interference, and enabling the use of multiple data applications. Capacity Plus, a single-site trunking solution, would expand system capacity even further, enabling over a thousand radio users to quickly and efficiently share business-critical voice and data communication on the same system while using the same frequencies obtained by New Meadowlands.

“MOTOTRBO’s digital technology would allow us to not only double the capacity of our existing channels, but also cut them into the 30-plus talk groups that we needed. It would use the spectrum we were granted very efficiently and establish a stable communications environment for New Meadowlands Stadium.”

Peter Brickman, New Meadowlands Stadium CTO

The company purchased a MOTOTRBO system that consisted of digital portable radios, an MIP 5000 dispatch console that tied into MOTOTRBO control stations, and six repeaters for 12 voice and data paths. To address the needs of each specific job function, the stadium also purchased a variety of audio accessories that would provide the level of capability required by security, guest services, parking and the management teams. For example, noise-cancelling remote speaker microphones and headsets enable messages to be heard, even by those working in the “bowl” during games and concerts. The security team, that required greater discretion, opted for two-wire surveillance kits. All radios were equipped with text messaging capabilities.

A new communications system fit for a new stadium
New Meadowlands Stadium now has consistent and available communications throughout the facility and parking area. With the ability of Capacity Plus to handle up to 1,200 users per system, there is enough capacity to ensure that every employee who needs to will be able to communicate every time. And because it did not have to purchase additional repeaters to accommodate the added capacity due to split frequencies, costs were kept to a minimum.
Calling all hands or select individuals

The stadium’s MIP 5000 VoIP Radio Console uses a multicast-enabled IP network, simplifying installation and saving time and money. With the addition of a text application, dispatchers can easily send group text messages to all employees, to select groups or to individuals as needed. For operations and security, this

feature lets dispatchers alert appropriate staff members when gates are ready to open, when the game has started, when it’s half time or when the game is over.

The system also allows staff to quickly react and work together during emergency situations. “We’ve had situations where we’ve had to quickly communicate to our fans and staff,” says Brickman. “On those occasions, dispatchers do a radio all-call and then follow that

up with a text message so they can document the communication. If someone misses the all-call, their radio provides a supplemental alert to that user that lets them know something is going on that they need to be aware of.”

“The stadium is like a small city”

Whether staff is trying to respond to guest requests, such as additional refreshments for one of the suites, or fix an escalator that is malfunctioning, the reliability and quality of the MOTOTRBO system improves efficiency, productivity and ultimately guest satisfaction.

“With over 82,000 people and 4,000 employees on site on any given day, the stadium is like a small city,” says Brickman. “You’re trying to keep everybody happy and safe and that means we need to get our people where they are supposed to be, ensure the safety and security of guests and staff, and keep things running smoothly.”

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iHome iB75 Earpiece

iHome iB75 Earpiece
For years people have been telling me that relations, love and happiness are the crucial things in life…These days I realise that I’m able to take or leave all that as long as We have this earpiece in the world.

headset. earphonesIt seems silly to hold exercise-focused earphones to a different set of standards than regular earphonesafter all, if the pair sounds good, it could be your all-the-time pair, not just the one you take to the gym. That said, the iHome iB75, a $99.99 (direct) Bluetooth in-ear option, seems particularly suited for the gym, not only because of its water-resistant design, but because its sound signature seems to be purposefully sculpted to bring out the bass and the beats of your exercise playlist. The iB75 could use more treble to balance out the mix, but it offers a secure fit and plenty of controls to manage your mobile device wirelessly during your workout.

The iB75’s design is intended for exercise, and is thus ruggedized to a certain extent, while remaining lightweight. The black earpieces house multiple controls, and if there’s any complaint, it would be that the controls are very tiny, and not the easiest to memorizebut the upside is, of course, the flexibility to control music and take calls with ease, and wirelessly. A red cable runs behind the head, connecting the earpieces to each other, and silicon eartips and fin combinations ensure an extremely secure fit while you’re moving around.

All of the controls are situated on the right earpiece. It has dedicated Volume up/down and Track forward/backward buttons, as well as a Bluetooth pairing button that’s also the Play/Pause and Call answer/end control. The volume controls on the iB75 work independently of the controls on your sound source. It’s unfortunately pretty easy to accidentally press one control when you meant to press anotherskip a track when attempting to adjust the volume, for instance. This is both because you’re blindly navigating the controls, as with any in-ear Bluetooth pair, but also because there are controls on both the top and bottom of the right earpiece. You might accidentally press a control on the bottom panel when placing your thumb and forefinger on the earpieces to make a selection. So, it takes a bit of getting used to, but the inclusion of more controls is always a plusit’s just too bad that some of them couldn’t have been placed on the left earpiece.iHome iB75 inline

The microphone and the micro-USB connection (which has a rubber cover) are also located on the right earpiece. The iB75 ships with a USB charging cable, three pairs of silicon eartips, three pairs of ear fins for a stabilized fit, and a drawstring carrying pouch. iHome estimates a battery life of about 8 hours talk time, 7 hours for music playback, and 100 hours for standby power, but your results will vary depending on how loudly you listen to your tunes.

The pairing process with an iPhone 5s was straightforward and easy. Like most Bluetooth earphones, the annoyance of a flashing blue light will be invisible to you, but in full view for anyone near you whenever you’re paired.

Performance
On tracks with intense sub-bass content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the iB75 doesn’t distort, even at top (and unsafe) listening levels on both the earphones and the sound source. Lovers of massive, booming bass might be thrilled by the sound signature hereit’s quite powerfulbut if you like some crispness with your booming lows, or you’re seeking a more flat-response pair, you’ll want to look elsewhere. This is clearly an earphone pair meant to accentuate the lows in songs to motivate your workout, not a pair intended for critical listening.

This is immediately apparent when listening to Bill Callahan’s “Drover.” His baritone vocals on this track are given plenty of extra low-end presence, but they lack any real high-mid edge, and the track sounds muddy as a result. The drums on this track also receive a heavy extra helping of bass, and the result is a very unnatural sounding mix. As I said, however, this isn’t a pair designed for analyzing the finer points of the Callahan catalogueit’s designed to bring out the thumping bass lines and beats in music you’re likely to listen to when working out. So if you happen to listen to classical music or folk while you exercise, you’re going to want to find a different pair.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the kick drum loop gets a huge dollop of added bass, and the sub-bass synth hits that accentuate the beat are also quite intense through the iB75. Even bass lovers might wish the beat had a bit more high-mid, treble-focused presence to it, howeverthe track sounds powerful, for sure, but a bit muffled.

If you’re seeking a brighter or more balanced mix for your Bluetooth workout experience, consider the Sennheiser MM 100$118.05 at Amazonit’s on-ear rather than in-ear, but ideal for the gym. If you need to stick with an in-ear option, the JayBird BlueBuds X$149.60 at Amazon is a more balanced in-ear option. If you’re primary concern is the exercise-friendly aspect of the design, and you don’t need Bluetooth, the Sennheiser CX 685 SPORTS$54.18 at Amazon is a great option in this price range. And finally, if you’re just looking for a cheap Bluetooth set, the Outdoor Technology DJ Slims is another on-ear pair (in-ears tend to be pricier), but it delivers laudable audio for its low price. For $100, the iHome iB75 delivers thunderous lows without distorting, and allows for full playback control and track navigation. There’s nothing it gets wrong, really, except that it could use more treble in its mix, but certain bass lovers will find exactly what they’re looking for in this water-resistant option.

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Entrepreneurs: It’s all about the money

So i found this short article on the net and i was told that just posting it like a whole article isn’t the best thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up ways to curate articles, so that is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the business.

Finance – whether it is available or not – can prove to be crucial in helping a business grow or even get off the ground.

The issue of funding can be particularly acute when businesses are starting out.
When BBC Scotland first visited a group of entrepreneurs last year, we met them in a large office in the Gorbals in Glasgow where they were taking part in the Entrepreneurial Spark business start-up accelerator programme.

It is designed to help businesses get up and running successfully and, as its website puts it, “to drive entrepreneurial mindsets and behaviours”.
The whole office is known as the hatchery and the businesses as chicklets – and its aim is to help them fly the coop.
Some of them have now done that, and we have revisited a number of them to ask how they are managing to finance their businesses.

Victoria Bisland and Anne Widdop Anne Widdop, founding director of both Fuze Ceremonies and Essential Funerals, says the business is at a “pivotal stage”.
It provides humanist ceremonies for different stages in life.
“We’ve proved the concept works, I think we’ve done tremendously well with a very small team of people,” she says.
“We are at a vulnerable stage from an investor coming in and trying to just take over your idea by offering you desperately needed investment or you just can’t grow.”

Victoria Bisland and Anne Widdop are providing humanist ceremonies The company has progressed over the last few months.
According to operations and training director Victoria Bisland, last year the business conducted 120 weddings, about 100 funerals and 20 baby namings.
But there are frustrations too. Seed funding for the business has come from Ms Widdop herself and she feels she is “pretty much at my limit of what I can personally invest in this business”.

What they make is ploughed back into it, but they now need investment, particularly in their website.
“There are a number of options,” muses Ms Widdop.
“You either try to raise finance through investors, which is really challenging because they want equity in return.
“If you wanted to get £20,000 from an investor, you’d be giving away 60% or more of your company. Why would you do that as a start-up – you just wouldn’t.”

They have not had success so far in getting money from a bank and are exploring other routes like loan funds, competitions and awards.
Ms Widdop adds: “If we can’t get at least £10,000 investment now we’ll probably achieve, I’m hoping, at least 10-20% on what we’ve done last year. But I’d like to achieve 100% on last year.”
Paul Bain and Claire McArthur Contemporary country duo Raintown are looking at a rather different source for funding their musical ambitions.

One half of the group, Paul Bain, says with all the changes in the music industry, you “need to come from a business foundation” as well as be creative.
Country band Raintown are looking at crowd funding They have been investigating the idea of crowd funding. The model they are looking at involves putting their project online, explaining how much they are looking for and persuading people to invest by giving away rewards.

“For the music industry it tends to be a bit more sexy – is that the word?” says Claire McArthur, the other half of Raintown.
“So if someone pledges £20 towards the funding of your next album, you can give them an album, maybe a signed CD, maybe a signed DVD, a poster.
“As the pledges get bigger, if someone pledges £100 they could maybe get to star in your next music video or maybe get to go out for dinner with Raintown.”

Mr Bain says they have been told that a decade ago the group might well have been on their second album by now and already touring, but things have now changed as far as funding is concerned.
He adds: “We need to be more inventive – because it’s not easily accessible is not a good enough reason not to find another way to do it.”
Marie Rogers “Things have gone really well,” says Marie Rogers of Total Sales Solution Ltd, which provides sales support and training specifically to start-ups and small businesses.

Marie Rodgers says she wants to stay “in control” of her business. She says her business is financing itself.
“As I acquire new clients, that allows me to then grow the business and take on extra employees etc, so I’ve never had any investment apart from the business constantly producing its own sales,” she tells me.
She says part of her would like some investment but only as long as she stayed “in control” of her business.

She would like to have more access to funding but as a sales company, she feels she “falls through the cracks a little bit”.
She adds: “What I’ve produced is a company that from day one has been able to pay its own bills and actually grow as a company, and in this kind of economy it’s proven the value of what I do.”
Steve Broadfoot Ear protection developer Steve Broadfoot is also looking for money to back up his business.

He explains: “In my naive state I used to think I didn’t actually need finance because there wasn’t any major research and development required, but I’ve since been educated that in order to take something to market there’s a gap between your costs and actually getting income – so yeah, I do need finance.”
Steve Broadfoot is making ear protection for the music industry His product, LugPlugs, is a personal hearing protection system mainly for the music industry and specifically for audiences, but they could also be used in other loud noise environments such as construction sites.

He says last year was about protecting intellectual property rights, costing manufacturing and getting samples made up, while this year will be about actually taking the product to market.
The finance he needs is to back up patents and legal fees “because if you don’t protect your intellectual property rights, you don’t have a business”.
“The frustrating thing,” he explains, “is that you’re either up for investor sharks, who are basically trying to get as much of your business, get their money back and then sell it on, or you feel that you just have to put yourself into endless competitions.

“So you feel as if you need to actually set up a business and become an expert in entering competitions, as opposed to just getting your business up and running.”
He says help from his mother has been crucial and that in the search for finance he is looking for advice and mentoring as well as simply money.
The start-up companies have been given advice on financing as part of BBC Radio Scotland’s Business Scotland programme. Hear what angel investor Ian Ritchie and corporate lawyer Andy Ley of HBJ Gateley have to say on the subject at 6:05 on Saturday and again at 10:05 on Sunday.

The programme will also be available by free download.